About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
aliens now. there have been promises of a u.s. visit program, an entry exit system to track everyone entering into the country to make sure they exit in time. that was first promised back in 1986, ten years later, 1996, congress passed another act to require a fully integrated entry-exit system and full implementation by 2005. guess what, madam president, 2005 has come and gone, it's been 30 years since that initial promise was made. we still don't have an operational effective u.s. visit system. madam president, my colleague from alabama mentioned another glaring example, the fence, the secure fence act. in 2006 we actually passed it in legislation. the secure fence act of 2006 promised to achieve operational control of the entire border. operational control the entire border. and it defind operational control. quote, "the prevention of unlawful entries into the united states including entries by terrorists, unlawful aliens, instruments of terrorism, narcotics and other droon band" -- close quote. well, we clearly haven't achieved that. in fact, we're so far from that goal, d.h.s. h
: this is "the new york times" from february 20th. budget cuts seen as risk to growth in the u.s. economy. the cuts, most likely would reduce growth by 1 1/2 of a percentage point in 2013, according to a range of government and private forecasters. that could be enough though to again slow the arrival of a recovery, producing instead another year of sluggish growth and high unemployment. >> guest: well i guess if you take it from "the new york times" perspective you could make that argument because i think they see already a slowing in growth happening and this makes a convenient fall person for bad public policy been in place under four years of obama administration. we have slowed growth. it has been very stagnant. there are a lot of reasons for it. there are a lot of friction points put in place in our economy that need to be fixed. until we get our confess and the president of the united states to work together and begin to remove those friction points we'll continue have slow growth. if you look at a same slide you had up a moment ago ago, shows the sequester on the right hand of tha
creative research. if you look at u.s. manufacturing, capital stock which is a reflection of basically how many machines, including 3-d printers, machines defined -- defined broadly, pretty much that used to grow every decade in america on the order of 25-55% a decade. our technology stock in manufacturing was doubled it in the 2000s it was zero essentially. which has never again happen in our history. the u.s. companies were not investing in automation initiatives. and secondly, we have this in her recent book, if you look at the share of corporate r&d as applied, excuse because basic, applied in development, we are the only industrial nation where the share of the corporate share in basic and applied to shrink in the last decade. every other country is expand their basic and applied for u.s. companies to the opposite. they expanded their development although that is flattened and their shrank. largely that's really, really risky, and shareholders are saying we really don't care about returned. and seven years we want returns next you. any other component of that is when you have the 27th
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
's number-one priority will be taking care of our troops. he is a veterans' advocate with the u.s.o. and he's won the respect and admiration of veterans' groups, in addition he's won the support of an extraordinary array of former secretaries of defense, ambassadors and diplomats, senior retired military leaders and in particular, two former members of this body who appeared with him at his testimony, former senators warren and nunn. i believe that chuck hagel is the right man for the challenges, the fiscal challenges that will confront the department of defense. put aside sequester, which i dearly hope will not happen, secretary panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will w
into a good movie. >> do you have any plans on expanding beyond the u.s. for instance if to europe [inaudible] thank you. >> international coverage is really interesting. i think that we are trying every single print issue of the magazine in at least a couple times a week to always have international content in the next. so we have had reported pieces from venezuela or we had someone embedded in afghanistan and we ran up peace in the last two issues on that so it's really important. the question just from the business standpoint is the economics that more often than not it works best for us to work with freelance reporters contributing for us in "the new york times" as well so we can get the content in the magazines but we don't have the bureau in paris or coal or something like that -- kabul or something like that that is the key to having a broad magazine in the future. >> are you going to make it weekly again? >> i don't think so. we don't have any plans to. it was hysterically, the previous ownership brought it down to buy a weekly. when i first bought the magazine i was a little skeptica
's nominee to be u.s. representative to the united nations. now some presidents include that position in their cabinet. some do not. but astpraoeud that singular insurance -- aside from that sing latin incident which i pointous was the democrats saying they're going to filibuster a nominee by the president and deny him a seat, so far as i've been able to tell there's not been ever an instant in the history of the senate where republicans have used a filibuster to deny a cabinet member an up-or-down vote when nominated by a president. that only leaves appellate judge nominations, circuit judge nominees. up until 2003, so far as i've been able to find, the rule of the senate was that the president's nominees to be on the federal courts of appeal always received an up-or-down vote. they were decided by a vote of 51. then our friends on the democratic side when president bush became president decided they didn't like that, and they changed the practice. they began to filibuster president bush's judges for up or down -- to deny them their seats. i had just arrived in the senate in 2003, mr
as u.s. story ?o are, is to -- senator, is to visit our courthouses where immigration and naturalization ceremonies take place. those ceremonies are profoundly inspiring because they come, new citizens, people about to become citizens, with their families. it is a day of joy and pride unmatched, and unexcelled in their lives. they come with friends and they come to celebrate with their friends and families. with tears in their eyes and their hearts and their throats, and there is no time that i have seen one of these ceremonies when i haven't been deeply moved and uplifted. if you ever have a down day, if you ever are discouraged about this nation, see one of these ceremonies. you will know what it means to be a citizen of the united states of america and how important it is and how important we should hard it. so i -- should regard it. so i approach immigration reform with appreciation of its importance to people who seek liberty and justice in this great land but also how we are enriched as a nation of immigrants by the diversity, the talent, the dedication they brin
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8